About Me

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Change. I've learned to embrace it, ride it out til the end. Sometimes I'm kicking and screaming, other times weeping with my eyes clinched tight. Once in awhile I ride like a dog in a car, head out the window snorting what life has to offer. Mother to young adult children, a marriage of thirty years, and a desert to mountain to valley waltz with God have shaped me into someone I never imagined I'd be. Life is short and I want to live it. Tears, sighs, laughter and change. Every morsel granted to me. Scrambled, shaken or stirred.

Sunday, December 14, 2008

Serials and Scenarios ~ Michelle Griep ~ E-Mace-i-pated.





I introduced you to Michelle on Friday. But today it Gallimore's birthday. Happy Birthday to you...etc. Michelle shares her thoughts via the standard Dregs ?'s. And a little bit more from me, too.


Fiction character you would most like to be or most identify with and why?

I always wanted to be Lt. Uhura on Star Trek because her uniform is pretty sweet, she gets to wear a funky ear piece, and she never had a bad hair day in her life.


If you could ask any person, living or dead, a random question -- what question would you ask of whom?

I’d ask Mr. Rogers about the whole sweater and sneaker attire…was that really your idea or your mother’s?


Some out there in writing land have strange rituals. Share yours.

It involves blood letting and small mammals, which I’m pretty sure is illegal in most of the contiguous United States. Good thing I live in the state of confusion (sorry, couldn’t resist).



If you could change something in any novel, what would you change about it and why?

I’ll be stepping on some toes here, but personally I’d cut a dinner party or two out of Sense & Sensibility.


What crayon in the box describes you on a good day? Bad day? Which one do you aspire to be?

I’m a marker girl myself, so I’m not really up on crayon colors.


Pick one…..Pink iguana, purple cow, periwinkle giraffe. Which one and why? Can be negative or positive.

Not touching that with a ten-foot pole.



Favorite turn of phrase or word picture, in literature or movie.

Classic: Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries. (from Monte Python and the Holy Grail)

Most Recent: The sun stretched its rays further and stronger, like a thousand lances determined to strike a strong blow and leave a red mark. (from In the Shadow of Lions by Ginger Garrett)


If you were assured of writing a best-seller, what genre would it be? Give us a sliver of information, a characteristic or glimpse of a scene.

Time travel – I love to throw myself into history, and of course I’m always the heroine. Naturally there’d be an unbelievably muscular hero who’s a warrior with a big heart that’s completely devoted to the heroine. And sorry, Fabio would NOT be on the cover.


What period of history intrigues you the most?

Medieval


What would you write if there were no rules or barriers? (epic novels about characters in the Bible, poetry, greeting cards, plays, movies, instruction manuals, etc.)

Whatever I feel like I wanna do! Gosh!


What makes you feel alive?

A cattle prod…don’t ask.


How does something worm its way into your heart? Through tears, truth, humor or other?

Time – I’m a slow learner.


Book, music, person, food you would take with you on a very long trip.

Book: Bible Person: Jesus
Music: Third Day Food: Chocolate


Where would you most like to travel ----- moon, north pole, deep seas, deserted island, the holy land or back to a place from your childhood, somewhere else? – and why.

England. I’m an Anglophile at heart.


Favorite season and why?

Autumn because of the amazing colors and the fact that hot chocolate is once again in season.


Favorite book setting and why?

Jane Eyre when she’s walking the misty moor and Rochester appears on a rearing horse. That’s how God most often works in my life. I’m usually walking around in a daze and bam! He appears.


Which compliment related to your writing has meant the most and why?

Actually, I try hard to ignore compliments and criticism (mean-spirited, anyway) because I don’t want to get a big head, nor do I want to have my heart pierced.


What would you do today if you knew you had only a week to live?

Eat lots of chocolate, drink lots of coffee, and tell lots of people about Jesus. Wait a minute…I do that anyway.


What is your favorite word?

Pinworms


What word annoys you more than any other?

Can’t


Superhero you most admire and why?

Underdog. What’s not to love about a pup in a cape?


Super power you'd love to borrow for awhile?

Invisibility


Favorite chore

Cooking


Anything you'd do but don't because of fear of pain? What is it? Ex. Bungee jumping, sky diving, running with scissors.

Stiletto Heels


Grammatical pet peeve…sound off.

Just say no to sentence diagramming.


Societal pet peeve…sound off.

Young men, pull up your pants or spackle that crack. I’ve seen enough boxers in my laundry basket. I do not need to see yours.




And a little bit of pondering from me...as inspired by Gallimore.....


Top Five Uses for a Fictional Raven


by Kelly Klepfer, inspired by Gallimore

5. A prime-time CSI type lackey for collection of DNA or evidence planting. With talons, intelligence and wicked sharp beaks, a raven can plant evidence or borrow evidence. Creativity is required here. If your Stunningly Great American Novel is set in a historical setting, DNA is a moot point. However, never overlook the possible inclusion of an evil wizard or psychotic bad guy to need to collect a lock of hair or a strip of skin.

4. Eye candy. Literally. Okay, this is gross, so close your eyes o' squeamish ones. Ready? Here goes. Carrion birds consider eyes a great delicacy and believe in eating dessert first, if you get my drift.

3. Nothing like a soaring black bird with a wing span equaling the height of a child. Yes. Edgy.

2. Swooping and terrorizing. Do I need to say more? Obviously the bird likes eyes, has an amazing wingspan and can collect DNA. Think about the implications. And Red Riding Hood thought that the wolf was a fright.

And the number one use of a fictional raven: Stalking. Two glossy beady eyes. Awesome sight and smell skills. That's what I'm talking about.

Hope you've gleaned helpful information and sufficient ravenicity to add drama, edge and creepiness to your work-in-progress. Romance and childrens' authors may want to consider the tastes of their readers. You don't want to get letters now do you? Perchance letters delivered by a raven....

The above was inspired by Michelle M. Griep's novel Gallimore. For those of you who are interested in raven antics as specified above, you'll find much satisfaction should you crack open the book. Trust me. Michelle went right for the big dog bird...no prissy little humming or songbirds for her.